Archive for the ‘Social Media and Film’ Category

Businesses from across the creative sectors create a new way forward with co-operative Future Artists Live and are already to work with Channel 4.

November 24, 2010

Cameron’s Big Society idea happening? Not likely!

The ‘Big Society’ is happening with out the need for Priminister David Cameron as businesses from the big to the small from across the creative sectors are coming together to form a new way forward with co-operative Future Artists Live and are already to work with Channel 4.

LogoIn the face of government cuts companies have come together to cut costs, improve opportunities and access to talent and are announcing the launch event and networking party on the 4th December in Manchester at Fac251 for anyone interested in finding out more.

Future Artists, a Salford based film and new media company that have used innovate approaches that have seen the company grow throughout the recession, have decided to turn part of their company into a co-operative and are kicking it off with live bands, DJ’s and Art.

So far members are both UK and international companies including film distributor Renderyard, the worlds biggest branded video contest and competitions company Mofilm’s President Andy Baker, Music industry thought leader co-founder of Unconvention Jeff Thompson, the world’s most comprehensive visual directory The Chook, the youngest producers currently working in the West End Hartshorn and Hook and the media content producers best friend DNA actors resource as well as Twitter Journalist Ian Aspin

Mark Ashmore of Future Artists explains ‘As a company we pride our selves in collective working and sharing so it just seemed natural that the next step was to turn Future Artists Live arm into a co-operative.’

The co-operative is intended as an informal trade network, knowledge sharing platform with the ability to provide training for members as well as an education resource, due to work with Channel 4’s 4 Talent and the UK’s most successful Twitter Journalist Ian Aspin in 2011.

‘It’s not about politics its about getting up, doing it and sorting it out for ourselves so we’re having a party for people to come down and see what they think’, explains Jenny Inchbald of Future Artists.

‘We are really pleased to have both large multimillion companies right down to freelancers on board. Its a meeting of minds with the great, the good, the old and the new!’ Mark Ashmore added.

Future Artists Live is also asking creatives and industry professionals to submit examples of their work to be screened at the event to show case their talents with each other.

Tickets are priced at £7 each and are available from www.futureartists.co.uk with all profits going to the co-operative. For more information or to join go to www.meetup.com/futureartists or search Future Artists Live on line.

ENDS

Please contact jenny.inchbald@futureartists.co.uk or call 07500 256 968 for more information

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Babelgum & Channel 4 Team for Episodic Doc Prequel

July 13, 2010

from worldscreen.com

Babelgum has entered into a co-production deal with Native Voice Films that sees the web platform working alongside traditional media partners to support the release of the documentary featureThe Bengali Detective.

The new project is a co-production between Babelgum, the Channel 4 British Documentary Foundation, DR2 Denmark, Commonwealth Broadcasting Trust and Salty Sea Music. Further production and broadcast deals are being confirmed.

Babelgum is to broadcast, starting today, specially commissioned prequel episodes for the film. The exclusive customized episodes will roll out on a weekly basis. These mini-documentary episodes will then be used to virally promote the feature film festival appearances and theatrical release of The Bengali Detective in 2011.

The feature-length documentary centers on the day-to-day investigations of Rajesh Ji. He is a dance-obsessed gumshoe with a motley band of helpers who look to expose the secrets, fears and covert lives of today’s middle-class Indian society. The accompanying doc series takes a look at modern India and highlights the real-world characters investigating cases in Calcutta.

“This deal is a crystallization of what we have been working towards at Babelgum’s film division,” said Karol Martesko-Fenster, the senior VP and general manager of the film division at Babelgum. “A true 360-degree production approach that doesn’t just pay lip service to the online dimension—but rather where online and mobile are the driving factors, working with, not against, traditional media, to virally create interest in the project before it is released on traditional platforms. Bearing in mind the ever-fragmenting nature of the media landscape and the need to target audiences across all platforms, it is the kind of approach that filmmakers will increasingly be adopting. We are excited to be working with Native Voice Films on this fantastic project.”

Phil Cox, director for Native Voice Films, added, “At Native Voice Films, we’ve always strived to make films built on strong storytelling that challenge our audience’s view of the world, while at the same time revealing the essential humanity of our subjects. We’re especially excited to be working with our co-producing partners at Babelgum on the premiere of The Bengali Detective. Together we’ve crafted a fresh, compelling approach to distributing the film, first as an episodic prequel and then as a full-fledged theatrical feature, harnessing their platforms to reach the widest global audience possible. It truly will be a landmark event and hopefully a guidepost for other independent filmmakers.”

see original article at http://worldscreen.com/articles/display/26226

YouTube envisions future of television viewing

April 23, 2010

from informitv.com

It is just five years since the first video was uploaded on YouTube by one of its founders. Now over 24 hours of video a minute are uploaded to the site and it receives over a billion views a day. YouTube has its sights set on turning a few minutes a day watching videos on the web to something more like the hours a day we generally spend watching television. That vision could become a reality once televisions are routinely connected to the internet.

“People think about the world of TV and the world of online video as being different ways to distribute video,” said Chad Hurley, the co-founder of YouTube, in an interview with the Telegraph newspaper. “But what happens when every TV is connected to wi-fi with a browser?”

“That is what we envision. Instead of this world of online video and this world of TV there is just one world,” he said. “There won’t be a difference in the future.”

“The iPad — is that a phone or a computer?” he questioned. “If I put it on my wall is it a TV? People continue to try to throw things in the buckets when really these are all going to be different-sized devices with a connection to the internet.”

As on the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch, YouTube has a dedicated application on the iPad. With its nearly ten-inch screen, viewing YouTube on the iPad feels like much more of a natural multimedia experience than on a laptop or desktop computer.

YouTube is already available through widgets or applications on various internet-connected televisions and an increasing number of televisions will be network connected in the next few years.

According to the co-founder of YouTube, the aim is now to deliver a more seamless experience across different devices. “We have some solutions for mobile, we have some solutions for TV, but they are not very consistent and they are somewhat separate. So, I start watching something on my mobile phone and then I can finish watching it on my PC, I sort my favourites on my PC and I want to watch it on my TV.”

Within the next five years, YouTube expects to see much more video viewed over the internet. “Although YouTube is the most successful video platform, the number of minutes watched, 10-15 minutes a day, is small when compared to the five hours watched on the TV set,” said Salar Kamangar, vice president of product management for YouTube. “It’s hard for me to imagine that in five to 10 years from now most of the content we consume won’t be delivered over the internet.”

see original article http://informitv.com/news/2010/04/18/youtubeenvisionsfuture/

Using Social Media Tools To Build A Truly Free Film Community

April 13, 2010

from trulyfreefilm.hopeforfilm.com

If only 30% of people’s online time is spent viewing content, then there is real hope for indie film.  The other 70% of users’ time is spent in search and social.  We know that people not only want todiscover stuff (like great stories and films) but even more so, they want to talk about it.

One way to define Film is as the transformation of leisure time into intellectual capital and then into social capital.

The question all filmmakers need to ask themselves is what can we do to get the others to talk about film more.  How can we improve the conversation people have about film?  We have the tools.

I loved B-side’s Festival Genius and hope it doesn’t go away now that the company has. One of major festivals, or indie film support orgs should acquire it (for their own benefit as well as ours).

(UPDATE 4/10 : Okay, I admit I have a crystal ball: the day after I wrote this, IFP announced it was acquiring Festival Genius.)

I was recently hipped to Dan Zeitman’s FilmFest from a comment on this blog by Weak Species‘ Dan Faltz.  FilmFest looks like it is much of the same thing as FestivalGenius.  All festivals should utilize these tools (please!). As they are available, it is safe to say that a festival that does not provide these tools are doing both their audience and their filmmakers a disservice.

Filmmakers should INSIST all festivals to utilize these tools, or refuse participation in them.  Or maybe it’s the other approach:  Let’s build a list of all the festivals that use these tools and encourage participation in them.

I spoke before about the idea of film festivals using Foursquare to engage audiences, but there are no doubt many more of this sort of ideas.   It might be time to develop a new list!  If only I had wasn’t trying to get my movies made, I would have some time to do something really important.  Lend a hand though: we can make it better together.

see original article http://trulyfreefilm.hopeforfilm.com/2010/04/using-social-media-tools-to-build-a-truly-free-film-community.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TrulyFreeFilm+%28Truly+Free+Film%29

free social media metrics and tracking

April 13, 2010

free social media metrics from http://wiki.kenburbary.com/social-meda-monitoring-wiki

Company Name Platform Name Media Type Coverage URL Free Country






The Search Monitor The Search Monitor (Starter and Pro) All http://www.thesearchmonitor.com/ Free USA
Crowd Favorite Addictomatic All http://addictomatic.com Free USA
mReplay Livedash All http://www.livedash.com Free USA
MyFrontSteps Steprep All http://steprep.myfrontsteps.com Free Canada
Inuda Innovations HowSociable All http://howsociable.com/ Free UK
Ascent Labs, Inc. StatsMix All http://statsmix.com/ Free USA
BuzzStream BuzzStream All http://www.buzzstream.com Free USA
Samepoint Samepoint All http://www.samepoint.com Free USA
Now Metrix Trendrr All http://www.trendrr.com Free USA
Social Mention Social Mention All http://socialmention.com Free USA

YouTube Saves Money With Text-Only Video

April 1, 2010

from mediamemo.allthingsd.com

by Peter Kafka

I’m down on this stuff in general, but have to admit I liked this one quite a bit. It helps if you’re into writing about the business of Web video, I guess: A memo from Google (GOOG) CFO Patrick Pichette explaining that the company has figured out how to save bandwidth costs at YouTube.

The rest of it is self-explanatory. But if you don’t want to read, you can go check out this sample video I’ve queued up for you.

Note that this doesn’t work on all of YouTube’s videos. And I can’t figure out how to make it embeddable. Enjoy.

see oringinal article http://mediamemo.allthingsd.com/20100331/youtube-saves-money-with-text-only-video/?mod=ATD_rss

Video Could Drive A 40-Fold Spike In Mobile Data Over Next Five Years

March 31, 2010

from paidcontent.org

A UK consultancy is predicting that tiered pricing plans for mobile internet are inevitable, given the dramatic rate at which mobile data—and especially video—is expected to rise in the near future.

By 2015, U.S. mobile consumers are expected to consume 327 petabytes of mobile data a month, rising at a compound annual growth rate of more than 117 percent, according to Coda Research Consultancy, which released the 87-page report today. As Mobile Crunch points out that represents a 40-fold increase in data consumption over five years.

At the core of this massive growth is mobile video, which Coda predicted will rise even faster. In 2015, video will consist of 224 petabytes of data a month, representing a compound annual growth rate of 138 percent.

One of the biggest topics at this year’s CTIA was how to keep up with consumers’ increasing mobile appetite. Whether this particular forecast turns out to be right, most carriers are looking at obtaining more spectrum and rolling out 4G to handle the curve. Steve Smith, co-founder of Coda, said carriers will cope by offering different rate plans for different levels of consumption. In a release, he said: “Flat-rate pricing has helped drive mobile internet adoption, but we envisage that as smartphone penetration rises and as carriers roll out 4G, carriers will have to move toward tiered pricing.”

Coda said that peak capacity is not as much the main concern as general capacity—which makes it even more scarier because that means the networks could be tapped out all the time, not just at big events, like a conference or baseball game. “As carrier networks now stand, network utilization will reach 100 percent in 2012 during peak times,” Coda said. At that same time, smartphone penetration will reach 40 percent in the U.S.

Other findings:
—the number of people accessing social networks from their phones is supposed to rise 21 percent annually between now and 2015.
—the number of mobile video users will rise by 34 percent annually to reach 95 million in 2015.
—non-SMS data revenues will climb at 17 percent annually, and will form 87 percent of all data revenues in 2015.

see orginal article http://paidcontent.org/article/419-video-could-drive-a-40-fold-spike-in-mobile-data-over-next-five-years/

Breakfast briefing: Google has its eyes on your TV set

March 30, 2010

from guardian.co.uk

• Everybody and their dog has been developing web-enabled TV sets recently, so perhaps no surprise to see that Google – the company that can’t keep its finger out of any pie it comes across – is working with Intel and Sony to create Android-compatible tellies. Somebody unlikely to be impressed by the 7,194th Google project, however, is outgoing US Federal Trade Commissioner Pamela Jones Harbour, who laid into the company for launching products “where the guiding privacy policy seems to be ‘throw it up against the wall and see if it sticks'”.

• Most of us probably wonder what information other people might know about us through our social networking profiles – but do we ever wonder what law enforcement can find out? Just weeks after the controversy over Microsoft’s “spy guide”, Electronic Frontier Foundation has released documents showing how US investigators obtain evidence from social networks. Worth reading… not that you’d ever do anything illegal of course.

• If you’re looking to have your mind boggled, then think about the chaos caused when more than 100 cars were shut down in Texas over the web. The suspect, apparently a disgruntled worker with access to a controversial online immobilising system used by car dealers, went on a remote shutdown spree that must surely call into question whether we could end up making our vehicles too connected.

You can follow our links and commentary each day through Twitter (@guardiantech, @gdngames or our personal accounts) or by watching our Delicious feed.

see orginal article http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/blog/2010/mar/18/google-sony

11 Essential Social Media Resources You May Have Missed

March 21, 2010

from mashable.com

We know you’re busy. Even with every social media, web, and RSS tool at your disposal, you can occasionally miss out on some of the week’s most insightful content.

Never fear. We’ve taken a moment to round up the bestMashableMashable resources from this past week and present them here for your weekend enjoyment.

From in-depth how-tos, to app lists, to valuable business guides, browse below for a veritable smorgasbord of value you may have passed over.


Social Media


FriendWheel

For more social media news and resources, you can follow Mashable’s social media channel on TwitterTwitter and become a fan on FacebookFacebook.


Mobile


Location Apps Image

For more mobile news and resources, you can follow Mashable’s mobile channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook.


Business


4 Ways Non-Profits Can Use Google Buzz

March 21, 2010

from mashable.com

Geoff Livingston co-founded Zoetica to focus on cause-related work, and released an award-winning book on new media Now is Gone in 2007.

Despite some initial flaws, Google BuzzGoogle Buzz continues to show promise as a social marketing platform. It has a significant (though somewhat latent) user base, with an increasing number of loyalists who swear by it.

When a green field lies before you, so does opportunity. Some non-profits stand to gain from being part of the early Buzz adopter community. Whether a cause needs to further the dialogue with a tech-savvy crowd, or is attracted to the functionality of GmailGmail integration, Buzz does bring some new capabilities to bear.

Here are four great uses for Buzz in cause-based activity.


1. Manage Public Conversations Better


A useful feature of Google Buzz is its public threaded conversation stream. This format has significant advantages over TwitterTwitter’s disjointed @reply conversations and hashtag-based threads, as well asFacebookFacebook’s often high privacy walls.

“We’ve been looking at using Buzz to have public conversations about Mothers Fighting for Others‘ work with an orphanage in Kenya,” said Jeff Turner, President of Zeek Interactive. “We want to be able to facilitate a consistent thread of conversation, but we want it to be more public and open than Facebook or [Google] Wave would allow. With Buzz, we feel like we can maintain a clear stream of thought around a topic, and at the same time, do it in a public forum where someone we might not be able to envision being interested could join in.”


2. E-mail Integration Means Better Workflow


Gmail Buzz ImageNon-profits could use Buzz to manage workflow across a group. This can be useful for an organization with project teams spread across multiple offices or in the field. With e-mail integration, it saves the organization from having to set up a separate account with another private conversation tool likeBasecampBasecamp.

“An example would be to set up Buzz as a private group for a project team, large or small,” said Shireen Mitchell, a Washington D.C.-based digital activist. “Twitter updates, blog posts, and other related content that has an RSS feed can be connected to individual [Buzz] accounts tracking topics related to the project. The team can make comments and select “like” to provide a consensus of interest on each update. This would keep the team updated on news, topics and content for any existing issue-driven social media campaign of the organization. [It’s] sort of a mini crowdsourcing of the team.”


3. Finally Connect to “Unsocial” Users


Another interesting aspect of Buzz’s workflow and e-mail integration is the use of a system that blends 2.0 functionality with a 1.0 system. Non-profit managers can use this to intelligently blend workforce conversations between younger and older, or tech-savvy and entrenched members of their teams. Crossing the streams may enable better communications.

“Google Buzz allows users to publish private streams to specific contact groups,” said John Haydon, a non-profit social media strategist. “This is a perfect way to include staff members who don’t use social media in important real-time conversations, especially during news-worthy events like the earthquake in Haiti.”


4. Geo-Location Adds a New Element


Location Map Image

When Google launches a social network, it brings more to bear than your average start-up. Consider the ability to integrate geo-location with Google MapsGoogle Maps into your social network activity. People can see social activity on the fly.

“Fast forward to a cause marketing campaign like Starbucks’ partnership with Product RED,” said Joe Waters, author of the Selfish Giving blog. “Buzzing about the latest campaign to a really large audience with geo-location features [enabled] lets people see in real-time all the people [talking] about the campaign in their area — especially in densely packed areas in New York where [Starbucks] are practically right across the street from each other.

“In short, Buzz can potentially broadcast a cause marketing campaign to a much larger audience than say Twitter. And the geo-location feature, if it takes off, can give a program a real-time, tangible quality that can’t be replicated on another [social media] platform.”

see original article http://mashable.com/2010/03/20/non-profits-google-buzz/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Mashable+%28Mashable%29