Archive for the ‘Film Release Stratergies’ Category

2010 Sundance film festival Winning Documentary to Screen in Salford on November 2nd 2010 @ 7.30pm

October 26, 2010

‘Restrepo’

The Film is being screened as part of a nationwide new distribution model created by Dogwoof films in London, and Salford Film makers from Futureartists.co.uk have been selected to promote the film in Salford, at a non traditional screening venue.

See trailer here

Co-founder of Future Artists Mark Ashmore explains

‘Films like RESTREPO are very important, and challenge an audience, but a gritty documentary about frontline life fighting a war, is not mainstream fair, and would struggle when placed against the latest Hollywood Blockbuster, we got the call with Dogwoof films and RESTREPO after successfully marketing and distributing our own film about Soldiers returning from Afghanistan, a film called ‘Broken Britain’ which was shot in Salford in 2008, ‘Broken Britain’ Will also be screened as part of the nights film program.’

Winner of the 2010 Sundance Grand Jury Prize, Restrepo is a documentary focusing on a deployment of a US platoon in Afghanistan’s hostile Korengal Valley. Over the course of 15 months two film makers Tim Hetherington (winner of four World Press Photo Prizes including World Press Photo of the Year 2008 and author of upcoming book Infidel) and Sebastian Junger (author of The Perfect Storm and War) lived with the unit shadowing their every move which resulted in extraordinary footage. From spectacular combat and ambush scenes to difficult discussions with local village elders, civilian and military deaths, never before has such access been granted. Restrepo is as close as it gets to seeing what life as a soldier is really like.

Restrepo

Showing at Islington Mill November 2nd 2010,

James Street, Salford, M3 5HW @ 7.30pm

Advance Tickets £6 from http://www.futureartists.co.uk

Film Program ‘Broken Britain’ 15min – ‘Restrepo’ 90min + Q and A

Directions : http://www.islingtonmill.com


DIRECTORS’ STATEMENT

The war in Afghanistan has become highly politicized, but soldiers rarely take part in that discussion. Our intention was to capture the experience of combat, boredom and fear through the eyes of the soldiers themselves. Their lives were our lives: we did not sit down with their families, we did not interview Afghans, we did not explore geopolitical debates. Soldiers are living and fighting and dying at remote outposts in Afghanistan in conditions that few Americans back home can imagine. Their experiences are important to understand, regardless of one’s political beliefs. Beliefs can be a way to avoid looking at reality. This is reality.

–      Tim Hetherington and Sebastian Junger

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Babelgum & Channel 4 Team for Episodic Doc Prequel

July 13, 2010

from worldscreen.com

Babelgum has entered into a co-production deal with Native Voice Films that sees the web platform working alongside traditional media partners to support the release of the documentary featureThe Bengali Detective.

The new project is a co-production between Babelgum, the Channel 4 British Documentary Foundation, DR2 Denmark, Commonwealth Broadcasting Trust and Salty Sea Music. Further production and broadcast deals are being confirmed.

Babelgum is to broadcast, starting today, specially commissioned prequel episodes for the film. The exclusive customized episodes will roll out on a weekly basis. These mini-documentary episodes will then be used to virally promote the feature film festival appearances and theatrical release of The Bengali Detective in 2011.

The feature-length documentary centers on the day-to-day investigations of Rajesh Ji. He is a dance-obsessed gumshoe with a motley band of helpers who look to expose the secrets, fears and covert lives of today’s middle-class Indian society. The accompanying doc series takes a look at modern India and highlights the real-world characters investigating cases in Calcutta.

“This deal is a crystallization of what we have been working towards at Babelgum’s film division,” said Karol Martesko-Fenster, the senior VP and general manager of the film division at Babelgum. “A true 360-degree production approach that doesn’t just pay lip service to the online dimension—but rather where online and mobile are the driving factors, working with, not against, traditional media, to virally create interest in the project before it is released on traditional platforms. Bearing in mind the ever-fragmenting nature of the media landscape and the need to target audiences across all platforms, it is the kind of approach that filmmakers will increasingly be adopting. We are excited to be working with Native Voice Films on this fantastic project.”

Phil Cox, director for Native Voice Films, added, “At Native Voice Films, we’ve always strived to make films built on strong storytelling that challenge our audience’s view of the world, while at the same time revealing the essential humanity of our subjects. We’re especially excited to be working with our co-producing partners at Babelgum on the premiere of The Bengali Detective. Together we’ve crafted a fresh, compelling approach to distributing the film, first as an episodic prequel and then as a full-fledged theatrical feature, harnessing their platforms to reach the widest global audience possible. It truly will be a landmark event and hopefully a guidepost for other independent filmmakers.”

see original article at http://worldscreen.com/articles/display/26226

YouTube Expands Movie and TV Rentals

April 23, 2010

from mashable.com

The YouTube Store has a much more impressive library than it did during its January trial period, including a few classics likeReservoir Dogs and recent critical hit PreciousThe Cove — one of the original five — is currently the most popular film in the library.

If you’re interested in trying out the service, rentals range from $0.99 to $3.99, and the rental periods vary. Some pages say 24 hours, while others say 72. When the service initially launched, it only had five Sundance films, which only drew in $10,709during the 10-day run. The New York Times deduced that figure by counting the number of views on each of the five films, but you can’t do that now — view counts are hidden.

Niche content like Bollywood movies and Japanese animation TV shows still place prominently in the lists of popular content — evidence that while the site does have some mainstream options now, they still don’t match what AmazoniTunesand Netflix offer. We find it curious that while iTunes and Amazon sell TV episodes for $0.99, the episodes on YouTube are just for rent.

NewTeeVee contacted the site and asked about the new content, which went up with little fanfare. A spokesperson told them: “When we announced YouTube Rentals in January we said we would be creating a destination after more partners joined the program. To date, we have nearly 500 partners that have joined our Rental program.”

see original article http://mashable.com/2010/04/22/youtube-store-rentals/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Mashable+%28Mashable%29

First 3D television sets go on sale in UK

April 23, 2010

from news.bbc.co.uk

By Dan Whitworth, Newsbeat technology reporter

3D TV has been one of the biggest technology stories of the year so far and Thursday morning (22 April) saw the first ones actually going on sale in the UK.

They’ve been available in the US and Japan for several months, but as expected they’re not cheap. The price of the first TV released is £1,799 – and there are lots of other bits of kit needed to get the right set-up.

A pair of the 3D glasses this system uses cost £150, a 3D Blu-ray DVD player is around £350 and a compatible HDMI cable is £50.

For 28-year-old Matt Rajah though – the very first person in the queue on Thursday morning – it’s worth the money: “Well I think it’s clearly the future of where television is going.

“I saw Avatar with my friends in 3D at the cinema and really loved that film. I’m also an avid gamer as well so I’m hoping to exploit some of the features of the TV through gaming.”

At the moment, the platforms available for 3D TV are limited. There are no 3D television channels and there are only a relatively small selection of 3D DVDs and video games.

John Kempner, the chief TV buyer for John Lewis, reckons that will change: “It is all about content. There will be more 3D movies coming along on Blu-ray. But more importantly Sky will be launching its 3D channel in around September time we think.

Video gaming is the other area where there’ll be a lot of 3D content available, which I think will be important too.”

That video game content is seen by some in the industry as a key driver of 3D TV sales.

It’s also worth pointing out that as well as 3D capability, the televisions going on sale also offer the latest 2D high-definition technology.

While some forecasts predict only modest sales this year, most experts believe it’s the future and that 3D TVs will sell in much larger numbers once the content improves and the price comes down.

see original article http://news.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/hi/technology/newsid_10080000/newsid_10085200/10085219.stm

April 23, 2010

from paidcontent.org

It took a couple of extra months but Fox and Universal have agreed to roughly the same deal with DVD rental kiosk company Redbox as Warner Bros. (NYSE: TWXdid in February. Both studios will now provide Redbox with “improved economic terms,” as well as additional access to Blu-ray titles, and, in exchange, Redbox will delay renting their new releases until 28 days after they are first available to purchase in stores, so that they can try to protect their sales. Redbox will also end its lawsuits against both Fox and Universal, which had become particularly ugly.

The deals come only two weeks after Fox and Universal bothannounced new distribution deals with Netflix (NSDQ: NFLX), which also agreed to delay distribution of their new releases for 28 days. In that case, however, both studios granted Netflix additional streaming rights in addition to improved economic terms.

With both Redbox and Netflix now agreeing to 28-day rental windows, Blockbuster (NYSE: BBI) has been trying to use the deals to differentiate itself from its rivals. It has now negotiated its own agreements with Warner Bros., Sony (NYSE: SNE) and Fox so it can rent new releases on the same day they are available for sale.

Related Stories

see original aricle http://paidcontent.org/article/419-redbox-ends-legal-wrangling-with-fox-universal-agrees-to-28-day-window/

The UK film council has released a report on digital and creative.

April 23, 2010

The UK film council has released a report on digital and creative.

Download a copy of the report here

Kick-Ass Hardcover Nears 100,000-Copy Mark

April 13, 2010

from wired.com

Sales of Kick-Ass, the hardcover collection of the violent and funny comic book series by Mark Millar and John Romita Jr., are about to hit the 100,000 copies as the movie version heads for theaters, according to Marvel Comics.

“My first inclination is to try to be clever and say that I have 100,000 relatives to thank … but I won’t,” said Kick-Ass artist Romita. “I’m extremely proud of this all, and very excited about working on the next two chapters!”

The 144-page book, which collects the eight Kick-Ass single issues published so far, focuses on the bloody misadventures of a wannabe superhero who dons a costume to take down bad guys. Loaded with grit, gore and adult language, the comic about young crime-fighters is definitely not for kids.

“The idea that a $25 book has hit 100,000 sales in a little over a month is just insane,” said Kick-Ass writer Mark Millar. “That’s roughly 10 times what Johnny and I were expecting and we would like to thank the comic-book retailers in America for their support of this book. This was not cheap and they took a gamble on us and I promise that Johnny will buy each and every one of them a drink at every convention he ever hits from now on.”

While Kick-Ass proved popular in its original run, the huge sales of the hardcover version show the power of the Hollywood-comic book crossover. The book is currently ranked No. 7 on Amazon.com’s comics and graphic novels best-sellers list.

Read More http://www.wired.com/underwire/2010/04/kick-ass-hardcover/#ixzz0l0ep3xN1

Using Social Media Tools To Build A Truly Free Film Community

April 13, 2010

from trulyfreefilm.hopeforfilm.com

If only 30% of people’s online time is spent viewing content, then there is real hope for indie film.  The other 70% of users’ time is spent in search and social.  We know that people not only want todiscover stuff (like great stories and films) but even more so, they want to talk about it.

One way to define Film is as the transformation of leisure time into intellectual capital and then into social capital.

The question all filmmakers need to ask themselves is what can we do to get the others to talk about film more.  How can we improve the conversation people have about film?  We have the tools.

I loved B-side’s Festival Genius and hope it doesn’t go away now that the company has. One of major festivals, or indie film support orgs should acquire it (for their own benefit as well as ours).

(UPDATE 4/10 : Okay, I admit I have a crystal ball: the day after I wrote this, IFP announced it was acquiring Festival Genius.)

I was recently hipped to Dan Zeitman’s FilmFest from a comment on this blog by Weak Species‘ Dan Faltz.  FilmFest looks like it is much of the same thing as FestivalGenius.  All festivals should utilize these tools (please!). As they are available, it is safe to say that a festival that does not provide these tools are doing both their audience and their filmmakers a disservice.

Filmmakers should INSIST all festivals to utilize these tools, or refuse participation in them.  Or maybe it’s the other approach:  Let’s build a list of all the festivals that use these tools and encourage participation in them.

I spoke before about the idea of film festivals using Foursquare to engage audiences, but there are no doubt many more of this sort of ideas.   It might be time to develop a new list!  If only I had wasn’t trying to get my movies made, I would have some time to do something really important.  Lend a hand though: we can make it better together.

see original article http://trulyfreefilm.hopeforfilm.com/2010/04/using-social-media-tools-to-build-a-truly-free-film-community.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TrulyFreeFilm+%28Truly+Free+Film%29

Hulu launches exclusive feature

April 1, 2010

from variety.com

‘In the Darkness’ is released by Mattoid Ent.

By LIZ STINSON

 
 

In a sign of the digital times, Hulu.com yesterday launched the first feature-length narrative film to premiere exclusively on its site.

“In The Darkness” is released by Mattoid Ent., which focuses on creating first-run content for online platforms.

Pic follows the disappearance of two young men in a fire-ravaged mountain range.

Mattoid co-founder and “Darkness” scribe and helmer Andrew Robinson said cost considerations as well as the chance for greater exposure led to his decision to preem via Hulu after taking a more traditional distribution approach for his 2009 pic “April Showers.”

see original article http://www.variety.com/article/VR1118017098.html?categoryid=13&cs=1&nid=2570&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+variety%2Fnews%2Ftechnology+%28Variety+-+Technology+News%29&utm_content=Netvibes

UKFC’s new Film Fund launches today with £15m

April 1, 2010

from netribution.co.uk

Wharton, Francke, Collins confirmed as executives working under Seghatchian in newly streamlined fund.

  • Biggest shake-up since UKFC’s creation
  • £15m film fund open for applications today
  • £5m Innovation Fund confirmed for Autumn 2010
  • New online application system for funds 
  • An ambitious sounding ‘web-based.. national filmmaking community’ 
  • Producers to receive equity in UKFC recoupment
  • WT2’s Natascha Wharton joins BBC Film’s Chris Collins and Em Media / EIFF’s Lizzie Francke on team

The UK Film Council today published its three year plan and launched its new £15m Film Fund to be headed up by Tanya Seghatchian. In developing the final plan, the UK Film Council spent three months consulting on the proposals, engaging with hundreds of people from across the film sector, facilitating more than a dozen consultation sessions and attracting almost 1,000 responses. The plan specifically:

  • opens up for business a £15m-a-year Film Fund (topped up further by film recoupment) for emerging, experimental and world class filmmakers;
  • ring-fences money for development;
  • confirms production companies will for the first time automatically receive a significant share of the UK Film Council’s recoupment from all feature film investments they are involved in, following State Aid approval of the measure by the European Commission;
  • sets up a think tank chaired by Tim Bevan to identify new policy initiatives to grow independent UK film companies of scale;
  • proposes a national web-based talent showcase, to be launched in Autumn 2010, to unearth fresh talent and to broaden the diversity, reach and the opportunities available to all filmmakers who are keen to engage with one another in a national filmmaking community;
  • confirms £5m is allocated to the new Innovation Fund, which will launch in Autumn 2010 (more details to follow);
  • provides £500,000 for film exports for each year of the plan;
  • confirms that 100% of recoupment from the Prints & Advertising Fund – which widens and supports the distribution of selected specialised films and British films – will, like the Film Fund, top up that fund’s budget.

Alongside this plan, the DCMS have been leading merger discussions between the UK Film Council and the BFI. These discussions have been underway since August 2009 and continue.

The new appointments to Tanya ‘Harry Potter/Heyday Films’ Seghatchian’s team include: 

  • Lizzie Francke, former head of EIFF and BFI Governor, will focus on experimental feature length films, national engagement and showcasing new talent;
  • Chris Collins, executive for Pawel Pawlikowski’s Last Resort, amongst others will focus on ideas for future film practices for both emerging and established filmmakers, from micro/low budget features and shorts, through to 3D blockbusters.

Launching UK Film: Digital innovation and creative excellence, Tim Bevan CBE, Chairman of the UK Film Council, said, “We’ve set out a renewed mission, a new set of priorities, and a new way of working. With the right level of support, a successful British film industry can continue to help get the UK out of recession, drive innovation and create more highly-skilled jobs. Further tough choices probably lie ahead, but having reduced our overheads by 20% and positively responded to the needs of British filmmakers we’re now in the best place we can be to support and promote UK film in the years ahead.”

John Woodward, Chief Executive Officer of the UK Film Council, announced that the new £15m-a-year Film Fund had opened its doors for business. Managed by a new team of experienced senior production and development executives, the fund has introduced a brand new online application process in which applicants will set out their creative and strategic visions for their film.

Woodward commented: “The new Film Fund’s primary focus is creative excellence. Tanya and her team will support filmmakers who want to put British filmmaking at the centre of our national culture and on the international map. The aim is for the Film Fund to attract the best talent, encourage creative risk taking, and deliver great films to audiences.

“Joining Tanya in the search for creative excellence will be a team of three Senior Production and Development Executives with an impressive and broad range of film industry expertise. Natascha Wharton, Lizzie Francke, and Chris Collins each have big production successes under their belts – together, it’s a team that will provide a wide range of expertise and tastes as well as a supportive, energetic and ambitious home for British filmmaking talent.

“The team will all work across the full range of projects in production and development, but individually they will also have specific responsibilities.”

The Film Fund is open for applications from 1 April, but it will be presenting a more detailed strategy to the UK Film Council Board in the coming months. It has already been agreed that a portion of the £15m budget will be ring-fenced for development – although there will be no automatic assumption that projects developed will become films that the fund would then invest in at the production stage. The remaining budget will be safeguarded for the Film Fund’s own production investments. Further details will be announced in the coming months, in addition to details of the Film Fund’s non-London investment target and how the new online showcase will operate.

Natascha Wharton

Natascha has been at Working Title Films for most of her film career.  During her time there,  she set up WT2, Working Title’s low budget film division.  The first film through that division was Billy Elliot, on which she was an Executive Producer.  She was Executive Producer on a further ten films through WT2, including Shaun of the DeadAli G Indahouseand My Little Eye. Later, when WT2 was absorbed into WT’s main slate Development Department, she became Head of Development and was Executive Producer on Hot Fuzz.

 

Lizzie Francke

Lizzie started her career as a film critic in the early 1990s, contributing to titles such as The Guardian, The Observer, Sight and Sound and Screen International.  During this period she also wrote the book Script Girls: The History of Women Screenwriters in Hollywood. In 1997 she was appointed Artistic Director of the Edinburgh International Film Festival and in her five years there re-established the festival as a key showcase for British cinema. She moved into production in 2001, first for Little Bird, where she co-produced Marc Evans’s thriller Trauma, then as Executive Producer for EM Media, where her credits include ControlAnd When Did You Last See Your Father?, A Complete History of My Sexual Failures and Better Things. She also acted as the British co-producer on Vinyan, the second film from the cult Belgium director Fabrice du Welz, which had its world premiere at the Venice Film Festival. Lizzie has been a Development Producer for the UK Film Council’s Development Fund since January 2008. She managed the First Feature stream, which is dedicated to emerging writing and directing talent. Films that she worked on during that period include the The Arbor, directed by Clio Barnard and debuting at the 2010 Tribeca Film Festival, and artist Gillian Wearing’s directorial debut Self Made, which is currently in post-production. 

 

Chris Collins

Chris started his career working in television documentaries, after which he joined BFI Productions in 1997 as a development and production executive, where he oversaw films such as John Maybury’s Love is the Devil and Jasmin Dizdar’s Beautiful People. He then spent ten years in the independent sector as a producer working with filmmakers such as Pawel Pawlikowski, Francesca Joseph and Sarah Gavron on critical successes Last ResortMy Summer of LoveTomorrow La Scala! and Brick Lane. He also worked with BBC Films on a series of shorts with filmmakers like Vito Rocco and Andrea Arnold. Since 2007 Chris worked as a Development Producer in the UK Film Council’s Development Fund where he managed the funding strand for experienced writers, directors and producers. Projects developed range from new screenplays by Duane Hopkins, Noel Clarke, Matt Greenhalgh and Hanif Kureishi to the recently completed Tamara Drewe, written by Moira Buffini from Posy Simmond’s graphic novel and directed by Stephen Frears.

see original article http://www.netribution.co.uk/stories/finance/1870-ukfc-launch-new-p15m-fund-appoints-wharton-collins-a-franke-confirms-innovation-fund